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CEO's message

Stephen Sadie
CEO, CSSA

Eskom knocks the lights out of corporate governance
Load shedding at Eskom has taken on a new turn. They have now knocked the lights out of corporate governance. While I do appreciate Eskom’s willingness in providing interesting case studies on poor corporate governance for our students, I would prefer avoiding having to deal with continual load shedding and the resultant traffic mayhem as I make my way home from work. Let us observe what has happened to Eskom’s corporate governance over the past few months.

Many members will recall that Tshediso Matona became a Fellow of CSSA by special entry. An interview with him was carried in the Boardroom magazine (Quarter 1 2012). At the time, he was Director General of the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE). Prior to his appointment at DPE, he had been Director General (DG) of the Department of Trade and Industry for five years. He was generally considered one of the more experienced DGs in the public sector. So it was with some dismay that I read in the newspapers that he along with three other executives at Eskom had been suspended.

Mohamed Adam, has been a regular speaker at our premier corporate governance conferences. In January 2015 we were informed that he had left Eskom. Mohamed held the position of Corporate Counsel/Divisional Executive (Regulation and Legal) at Eskom and was generally responsible for corporate governance at Eskom. Mohamed was also the former company secretary at Eskom and is highly respected in corporate governance circles. I have come to know Mohamed well as we both serve on the King Committee. Mohamed left Eskom to take up a position with ArcelorMittal where he joined Paul O’ Flaherty, Eskom’s former FD who is now CEO at ArcelorMittal.

The skills exodus at Eskom has reached epic proportions. Brian Dames, Eskom’s earlier CE, came through the ranks of Eskom as an engineer. He has not spoken much about his departure but it is rumoured that he found the continual interference from government difficult to deal with. Brian Dames is now with McKinsey. After Brian Dames’ and Paul O’ Flaherty’s departure a stream of executive resignations followed. Two examples, among many, are Steve Lennon, group executive for sustainability, who announced his departure months ago but only left at the end of March 2015. Erika Johnson, group executive enterprise development, left in October 2014. This level of executive loss would be difficult for any entity to deal with, let alone Eskom, which is in dire straits with continual load shedding and severe financial constraints.

To get back to Tshediso Matona. Matona was suspended along with Tsholofelo Molefe, finance director; Dan Marokane, chief of capital infrastructure; and Matshela Koko, commercial and technology head. Matona had only been in the job since September 2014.  How would it have been possible for any CEO to turn Eskom around in 6 months? Zola Tsotsi, Eskom’s chairman at the time, was at pains, in announcing their suspension, that they had done no wrong. So then it is a bit of a mystery why the drastic action of suspending four executives was taken? Tsotsi was then appointed head of the board investigations subcommittee. Tsotsi would be in charge of determining the terms of reference, contracting investigators and overseeing its progress. But Tsotsi himself had been overseeing Eskom for the past four years. Matona had only been in his post for a few months.  How was it possible that Tsotsi should oversee the investigation? He was not independent. Tsotsi then brought in his favoured investigator, the relatively unknown Nick Linnell. Nick Linnell had however conducted an investigation into SAA’s CEO Monwabisi Kalawe, another SOC undergoing severe stress. Mr Tsotsi has also made binding commitments with Japanese company Sumitomo, which is highly unusual for a chairman. The board then took a resolution to remove the chairman.

They also removed Nick Linnell as investigator and replaced him with a small Cape Town based legal firm, Dentons. The Johannesburg office of Dentons only opened earlier this year. Dentons has not featured at all in South African Law Reports (30 April 2015, BusinessDay).  It remains to be seen whether Dentons is capable of doing the “deep dive” that minister Lynne Brown expects.

One of the key underlying issues is the difference between management and governance. Management is responsible for running the company. The board is responsible for overseeing the work of management and providing guidance and direction. The board is not responsible for the day-to-day running of the company. Eskom’s board seems to have lost the distinction between governance and management. This was led by the former chairman’s incessant interference in the running of the company. Dr Ben Ngubane was appointed acting chairman. He has not exactly covered himself in glory while he was chairman at SABC.

The Eskom board was almost completely changed when Malusi Gigaba became minister of public enterprises four year ago. Unfortunately the board at that point lost a lot of skill with people who had both local and international experience of business and electricity.

Unfortunately, poor governance costs money. Moody’s downgraded Eskom to junk status after the decision to suspend four executives.  

In a bit of razzmatazz, in mid-April it was announced that Brian Molefe, Transnet’s CEO was appointed acting CEO. Molefe comes with a good background as CEO of Transnet and prior to that CEO of the Public Investment Corporation. In a bold move, soon after his appointment,  he promised the end of load shedding by December. However Molefe may find that unravelling Eskom’s problems may be a lot more difficult that his experience at Transnet.

Matona has taken his case to the CCMA for unfair suspension. He was suspended for three months which is nearly up. What happens to Matona now? Will Eskom have two CEOs? Matona’s court documents make interesting reading. He claims that the decision was not made by the board but by the governance committee. Matona would be very familiar with suspension procedures given his long tenure as DG of both Public Enterprises and Trade and Industry. He describes his suspension as both substantively and procedurely unfair (15-21 May 2015, Mail and Guardian). The suspension notice did not allege any misconduct but wanted the investigation to be open and free from influence.

The minister does not seem to have worked out clearly what would happen to Matona after the suspension period. She is quoted as saying “Brian will be here and we’ll find a way for Tshediso to work with him; we’ll give him some other title or something.” (15-21 May 2015, Mail and Guardian). This doesn’t seem to be a properly considered scenario.  In the meantime, Matona’s CCMA case is still ongoing. One possibility is that he will be paid to go quietly, which seems to have become a standard feature amongst key state organs in the past few months. One only need look at SAA, Sars, the Hawks, etc.

While we all wait for the lights to come on, corporate governance continues to be bedevilled. The economy is slowing down due to Eskom’s inability to provide energy. Corporate governance seems to lurch from crisis to crisis at Eskom. We all wait with interest as to how this process is going to unfold. In the interests of the country, could we improve the governance of Eskom? We don’t mind looking elsewhere for case studies on poor governance for our students.

 

The combined role of the company secretary, legal advisor and compliance officer

by Karen Robinson, Company Secretary, Fedgroup

As the business world contracts and expands, positions and job titles morph to meet the dynamic requirements of companies.  The size of the company, the complexity of business and the degree of regulation of the industry in which operated all play a part in determining how it chooses to appoint its company secretary, legal advisor and/or compliance officer.

The role of the inhouse legal advisor has a long history in South African business and following the publication of the various King Reports, the rise and dominance of the company secretary has played out in recruitment firms across the country. Until recently, compliance officers were a strange creature only found in the financial services sector and then only because the Financial Services Board prescribed their presence.  Nowadays and no doubt as a result of the increased legislative burden on companies and the impact of non-compliance, other industries are appointing compliance officers. A particular focus seems to be on ensuring compliance with the Competition Act and interestingly, many appointments seem to be made in those industries which have seen the results of transgressions.

Given the retraction of the economy and the concomitant tightening of the proverbial belt, companies have fallen into the habit of combining these roles in various iterations. There are indeed synergies between the roles: all deal with the law; all are required to make decisions in the best interests of the company. It is however in the subtleties that the important differences prevail.

In approaching any set of facts or challenges presented to such an incumbent, it is important to realise that each role will view the matter differently.  The legal advisor will view the matter from a risk perspective: what is the impact on my client; the potential damages; the ongoing liabilities? A company secretary would focus on how best this matter would be addressed through the governance structures of the company? What approval process and potential conflict of interest could arise?  Do directors require any additional training and is the existing professional cover adequate?  A compliance office in turn would approach the matter administratively: fees that might be required to be paid, regulators that will need to give prior approval and/or receive notification.

In addition, careful consideration must be given to the practicalities of the workload of each role. Proper oversight of a department by a company secretary requires constant monitoring. Ongoing awareness of the business and matters that may require disclosure in terms of Stock Exchange Listings Requirements is essential, as is involvement in any corporate action that the company may be undertaking.  That said, the monitoring role of a compliance officer is even more arduous, particularly in a financial services environment. The expectations of the Financial Services Board in respect of response turnaround times are strict and the censures for non-compliance can be severe. 

It has also been the experience of the writer that the reporting structure in a company which effectively removes responsibility for governance from the company secretary and places it with the inhouse legal advisor (who may hold a more senior management position) is a significant risk. The company secretary has a sacrosanct role within the board structures which permits him or her to tap into sensitivities in decision making processes. The company secretary is also protected by an element of independence and direct access to the Chairman. A company secretary without direct responsibility for governance is placed in a frustrating position and given the fact that a legal advisor may well view a particular issue from a different perspective, governance is ultimately the loser in the scenario. 

A word of caution then to the industry; you may find that combining roles reduces the salary bill, but it may also have the somewhat disastrous effect of increasing your liability, risk and non-compliance. Any appointments which anticipate combined responsibilities must be carefully considered.

Profile: Karen Robinson

Karen Robinson
Company Secretary, Fedgroup

Background and studies
I have an LLB from UNISA and a few other things; when my professor returns from his sabbatical and gets around to marking my final dissertation I hope to have an LLM in Corporate Law.  My career path escalated rapidly from my first position as an assistant company secretary in a mid-cap listed company to the then-fourth largest gold mining company in the world. It was not a whirlwind I would readily recommend but I am tremendously grateful for the experience and the interesting people I met along the way.  I am presently the company secretary of the FedGroup and also serve as the company’s legal advisor. To make matters interesting, I have also taken over a role in compliance.

Can you describe briefly what current job entails?
Like every company secretary, my immediate response to this question is “herding cats”!  Fate has brought me to a very interesting environment: the largest privately owned financial services company in the country. Balancing entrepreneurship and selling the benefits of structured systems of governance is challenging but rewarding and certainly requires you to think very carefully about implementing governance in a manner which is meaningful to the company. I sincerely believe that there is no longer a place for ticking boxes; corporate governance must earn its keep in any organisation.

What do you enjoy about your career and challenges?
The company secretary plays an incredibly significant role in a business particularly with regard to guiding policy, advising on strategic decisions and lending counsel. This is however always done in the background. Anyone in this line of work must be prepared to work in subtleties. It is important to understand the culture of a company whenever providing guidance or it will not be effective and any attempt at implementation will be resisted. This can be challenging sometimes and creativity in finding solutions is always required. Company secretaries nowadays must have a thorough understanding of how the King recommendations benefit their companies.

Why did you choose the CSSA qualification/how has the course contributed to your career?
Like many of my colleagues, I was drawn to the idea of attaining the highest possible endorsement for my chosen career.  Passing the board examinations is no easy task and it requires a great deal more than understanding the course material.  In my experience it requires resolve, courage and tenacity: a devotion to the profession.

Why would you recommend the qualification to others?

I do believe that if you really want to do something, you should do it properly. Strive for every opportunity to excel in your profession. If you are able to pass the CSSA board examinations, it is a clear indicator to your colleagues and potential employers that you mean business and you are prepared to work hard!

What is your view on the role of the Chartered Secretary in the work place of today?

The Chartered Secretary has a very significant role to play in any business and the length and breadth of your contribution to your company can be limitless, depending upon how far you choose to apply yourself. People in this profession have been directly responsible for many of the key business decisions that have taken place across a variety of industries: mergers, acquisitions, unbundlings, appointments, investments and social development have all transpired through the actions of dedicated Chartered Secretaries.

Any inspirational anecdotes for fellow members and students?

My greatest moment in my career was sitting in the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium watching the legendary world cup soccer match between Brazil and Holland in 2010 and realising that almost every aspect of the creation of that magnificent building, from the structural steel to the grass in the forecourt, had passed over my desk in some form or another. It reminded me that every small role company secretaries play, forms an essential part of a bigger picture. Sometimes it isn’t very glamorous, but it is nevertheless very important. In another instance, I had the privilege of watching Mamphela Ramphele and Cheryl Carolus dance with rock drill operators 2900m underground. It was a humbling experience that reminded me how far we have come as a country and the significant role we all play in what direction we travel in the future.

How do you enjoy spending your leisure time?

What is this strange thing of which you speak?! Perhaps I should find out….

 

Member Profiles

Natasha Camhee
FCIS
Chief Executive Officer, Arenkwe Governance Services

Background and studies
I first started with the Damelin accounting diplomas and wanted to become a Chartered Accountant.  A wise old man advised me to become a Chartered Secretary and do some research on the professional qualification.  I started with the CSSA from inception and completed the Board exam during 2012.  During 2011, I took a gap year to complete my higher diploma in Corporate Law at the University of Johannesburg when the new Companies Act of 2008 was promulgated.  During 2009, I completed a certificate programme through Ethics SA and am now a certified Ethics Officer and Arenkwe my company can now write codes of Ethics and use the Ethics SA logo along with our own. I spent a year doing a programme on woman in leadership through GIBS and am now a Fellow member of the International Women’s Forum of South Africa.  I am currently the Founder and CEO of Arenkwe Governance Services, consulting firm.

Can you describe briefly what current job entails?

As the CEO, I am accountable for the success of the company achieving its vision, mission and mandate.  I also do most stakeholder engagement to build the brand value and gain the market share as Corporate Governance and Company Secretariat is still a niche market on an outsourced basis.

What do you enjoy about your career and challenges?

I enjoy assisting clients do a due diligence of their compliance environment and then proposing solutions to either enhance or correct their internal controls and governance structures.  My greatest challenge is delegating to anybody the duties of the CEO when travelling, albeit I have to!  With all the electronic communication and tools, I can still have oversight though.

Why did you choose the CSSA qualification/how has the course contributed to your career?

The CSSA qualification was recommended to me by a Chartered accountant during 2002. The CSSA qualification, especially after being awarded the Fellowship membership, has opened so many business opportunities as well as the PPG practice number.  The qualifications diversity will assist any CEO to understand all areas that underpin a successful business.

Why would you recommend the qualification to others?

I would as a brand ambassador of my own qualification firstly!  We as Fellows and Associates must live the brand of CSSA.  It provides diversity to any student, as well as the opportunity to enter the Boardroom eventually.  The Company Secretary is always well respected by all internal and external stakeholders.

What is your view on the role of the Chartered Secretary in the work place of today?

The Chartered Secretary is well respected and is the gateway between management and the Board.  The Company Secretary should, if well-equipped, be the advisor to the Board, Chairman and the CEO.  If the Company Secretary does not understand their role, this discredits the position in the workplace back to the perception of Scribe.

Any inspirational anecdotes for fellow members and students? 

“An empty space is a place”, if you do not take the space you will never realise your full potential.  Carry the flag of CSSA, that’s where your future is going.

How do you enjoy spending your leisure time?

Reading and research on leadership.  Movies with my children and ten pin bowling.

 

Member profiles

Lerato Matlosa
GradICSA
Company Secretary, Atlatsa Resources Corporation

Background and studies
I completed an LLB degree with the National University of Lesotho, and was admitted as an advocate in the High Court of Lesotho in 2007. I later enrolled for a Masters degree in Corporate Law. Although it took a while, I have completed the Chartered Secretary qualification with CSSA. I further completed a post graduate certificate in Prospecting and Mining Law with the University of Witwatersrand Mandela Institute. I am a Member of the Institute of Directors, member of the Canadian Society of Corporate Secretaries. I am a Trustee of the Anooraq Community Participation Trust and Bokoini ESOP Trust. The Community Trust objectives are to promote social and economic development in mining affected communities.

I started out as a waitress, and then joined the Rare Group (a JSE Listed company) as a legal professional assistant and assistant company secretary. This is where I first got introduced to the Company Secretarial role. I have since moved on and currently work as the Company Secretary of Atlatsa Resources Corporation, a Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX), New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and JSE listed company.


Can you describe briefly what current job entails?

My current job entails company secretarial administration, providing the Board of directors with guidance on various corporate governance and compliance issues in line with the TSX, NYSE and JSE listing requirements and relevant legislation. I am also responsible for the production of the AGM circular and ensuring that company policies and corporate governance and procedures manual is adhered to.

What you enjoy about your career and challenges?

I have always loved debates and was in my high school years captain of the debating team. Therefore I enjoy boardroom discussions and the process of decision making. Being part of the strategic mind of the organisation, and serving as a vital independent bridge between the board and the executive, whilst also contributing to director development and in turn to the growth of the business is fulfilling. In addition, being a community trustee, although difficult, is a humbling experience.

The challenge about my role is being able to think beyond the law and have integrated thinking that entails understanding the business, the market and boardroom dynamics. This means constant reading and long hours. Board packs are also a nightmare.

Why would you recommend the qualification to others?

The CSSA qualification is the hardest thing I have ever studied, but the benefits are endless. It gives one the credentials to sit on the “adults table” where cutting edge decisions are taken every day…for anyone who wants a dynamic respectable career; this is the qualification to go for.

What is your view on the role of the Chartered Secretary in the work place of today?

As Chartered Secretaries our role has changed from being known as the just minute taker or the “secretary” that provides tea. We have become vital members of the board and management team. There are, however, still challenges with embracing this new role from the market perspective, but companies are slowly embracing it.

How do you enjoy spending your leisure time?

I love the open road. Although I do not do as much driving and travelling as I would like, it is for me the best way to unwind and recharge. I also enjoy running, although my sleep takes the better of me. I have been blessed with great girlfriends and Friday nights with them is my favourite thing in the whole world!

Board Evaluations and Feedback

by Lerato Matlosa, GradICSA, Company Secretary, Atlatsa Resources Corporation

INTRODUCTION
Behavioural psychologists and organisational learning experts agree that people and organisations cannot learn without feedback. No matter how good a board is, it’s bound to get better if it’s reviewed intelligently.1

Board evaluations have been found to be an effective tool to provide the board with an opportunity to review the balance of skills, experience and diversity both of gender and perspective. Evaluations provide the board with an opportunity to openly discuss whether the strategy and plans in place are adequate for the long-term success of the company. On top of these, evaluations also allow the board to assess the processes of board support and decision making.2

Despite their growing implementation, board assessments, in some cases, are falling short of their promise of enhancing board effectiveness. This paper looks at reasons put forward by the school of thought that asserts that board evaluations and the feedback therein are a waste of time. In addition, the paper will provide a non-exhaustive list of solutions or ways to get the best out of board evaluations and the feedback therein.

A WASTE OF TIME
At the annual conference of the National Association of Corporate Directors held in Washington D.C. in 2009, Phil Laskawy, former CEO of Ernst and Young, drew applause from the crowd when he stated that “board evaluations are a waste of time”. This emanated out of the findings of the NACD 2009 Public Company Governance Survey of 623 respondents who work with, or serve on company boards, majority of them judged board evaluations as ineffective,3 expensive and time consuming.

Evaluations that are said to be ineffective suffer from one or more of the following problems:

1. The objective of the assessment is not clear
Boards are sometimes evaluated in a vacuum and it is unclear what the objectives of the assessment are and what is to be accomplished. Boards must be evaluated in relation to the criteria that are set by the corporation and agreed on, so that boards know they are held to a standard that is explicit.

2. The chair’s critical leadership is missing
Benjamin Zander once observed that he suddenly discovered at age 45 that as conductor of the Boston Philharmonic Orchestra he was the only person on the stage who didn't make a sound. His job, he realised, was to create great things out of the individual talents that were in front of him.4

This is a really good description of the job of a board chair: to bring out the very best in the talent that is around the board table, both the directors and the managers.5 The chairman’s level of engagement with the process is almost universally believed to be key to the success of any evaluation.6 Before the evaluation starts, the chair should make it clear that open and honest feedback is both valuable and needed.

3. Feedback is often vague and unhelpful
Board members or company secretaries often do not know how to interpret or present the evaluation results. Often the questionnaires are long with a simple yes or no or abstain answer. Most directors choose to abstain or provide “politically correct” answers. As a result, the feedback is vague and unhelpful.

In addition, too often evaluations are prepared with very nice binders and lots of impressive charts and graphs, but readers cannot easily find the crucial information they are looking for. And even when they do, they often still cannot find the answers to their questions. Such evaluations often end up unread and thrown way.7

4. Feedback is not given consistently across the board
Sometimes where parts of the feedback are very negative, to preserve peoples’ feelings, the person responsible for providing feedback edits out all the critical negative feedback. As a result, legitimate issues identified are neither acknowledged nor addressed.

5. Anonymity
The lack of specific examples when raters do not want the recipient to guess who gave the evaluation is the biggest drawback to anonymous feedback. Without specific examples of a person’s behaviour or performance, the recipient has little to nothing to work with. Anonymous feedback, at its worst, can provide room for personal retribution, and, if tied to appraisal, may even affect an individual’s compensation or opportunity for growth.8

SOLUTIONS
1. Allow time for discussion of the results
Insufficient time during the board meeting was noted as the biggest impediment to effective evaluation and follow through. The board should set aside time to discuss the evaluation results fully. This should be planned for as a vital agenda item.

2. Bring in independent third party assessment
Behavioural issues are harder to expose with internal evaluations. Boards believe that external evaluations will help surface behavioural issues and provide suggestions for resolving them. External evaluators may find it easier to “tell it as it is”.9 However, caution should be applied with bringing on an independent evaluator because if the directors lack rapport with the evaluator or the evaluator lacks an understanding of the business or appears to revert to “box-ticking”, third party evaluation can also fail.

3. Careful dissemination of individual feedback
Individual director evaluation reports are best handled through a one-on-one discussion, usually with the chair or lead independent director. It is not advisable to distribute or table individual director reports at the seating of the whole board.

4. Discuss team issues openly
Team issues include the chair’s handling of meetings and other matters affecting team performance, such as the adequacy of board skills and whether the board spends sufficient time on the right things or strategy, or whether directors come prepared for meetings.

5. Feedback should have a board works programme
This programme specifies which recommendations are to be undertaken, who is responsible for ensuring that it occurs, and when do those recommendations have to be implemented. This provides a formal accountability and project plan for the board, which is more likely to result in recommendations being actioned.

6. Participating in evaluations and feedback should be used as a reward mechanism
Board members are sometimes not interested in participating in the evaluations. As noted earlier, one school of thought regards board evaluations as a waste of time. To ensure that all board members participate in the board evaluation, similar to CEOs or senior management evaluations should be tied to some form of incentive i.e. review of yearly board fees should be dependent on evaluations and feedback being followed through.

7. Feedback should be clear and precise
To avoid waste of time and frustration with feedback, the results must be packaged in a way that is easy to read and is responsive to the needs of the audience. Often an introductory one page summary, primarily written with bullets, is enough.

CONCLUSION
As the Ken Blanchard cliché goes “Feedback is the breakfast of champions”, without effective and honest feedback board evaluations can and will be a waste of time. Specific board team dynamics should be taken into account to encourage and ensure that the evaluation process yields desired results. Clear objective of the evaluation together with participation and leadership of the chairman is critical to ensure that evaluation benefits are realised.

References
1 Sonnenfeld, J. (2002) What makes great boards great, Harvard Business Review, 80(9), 106-113.
2 http://idealog.co.nz/workplace/2015/04/why-board-evaluations-are-not-report-card
3 Great Companies Deserve Great Boards: A CEO's Guide to the Boardroom  By Beverly Behan @ pg 76
4,5 http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/corporate_finance/are_you_getting_all_you_can_from_your_board_of_directors
6,7,9 Research into the effectiveness of UK board evaluations Ian Muir Keeldeep Associates Ltd Sponsored by Ashridge Business School October 2012
8 https://nonprofitquarterly.org/management/14386-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-of-360d-evaluations.html

 

CSSA Events

 


Crawford Career Day
Elizabeth Defillo (left), Powertech Group Company Secretary, and Sameera Khan (right), Assistant Group Company Secretary, represented Powertech and Chartered Secretaries Southern Africa at Crawford College Sandton’s Career Day on 29 April 2015.

Elizabeth and Sameera provided scholars with an overview of the CSSA course, the role and duties of a company secretary under relevant legislation, corporate governance best practice and how these duties applied to their day-to-day company secretarial responsibilities at Powertech, a subsidiary of the listed entity Altron.

“A general misconception still exists out there that a company secretary is an executive PA.  Scholars, and even quite a number of parents, were very surprised at what the position of company secretary actually entails and that passing the CSSA international qualifying examination provides candidates with a NQF8 professional qualification,” said Elizabeth. 

“One parent was particularly drawn to the slogan on CSSA’s banner “I Am” (a go-getter+ Sharp+ Bold+ Driven+ Brainy+ = Candidate) and remarked that “these are two very powerful words” in attracting potential candidates to the profession.  This parent expressed interest in CSSA attending various school holiday programs she arranges through her organization for children who live in under-resourced communities,” said Elizabeth.

Integrity and ethics should permeate through all spheres of business.  The world certainly needs more effective “gatekeepers of corporate governance”, said Elizabeth, “and Powertech Secretariat together with CSSA will continue to endeavor to attract the right candidates to the profession.”

 

Upcoming CSSA CPDs

Region

Date

Topic area

Topic

Speaker

Time

CPD hours

Johannesburg

21 May

Tax

Tax Administration Act update

Carmen Westermeyer

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

18 June

Accounting

Practical accounting for IFRS for SME'S: Asset accounting (PPE, investment properties, inventory, intangible assets)

Caryn Maitland

08h00 – 12h00

4

1 July

Governance

Practical risk management

Pat Mahony

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

16 July

Secretaryship

The basics of company secretarial work

Carina Wessels

09h00 – 15h30

6

18 August

Law

The practical implementation of the POPI Act in an organisation

Robby Coelho

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

Durban


21 May

Accounting

Practical accounting for IFRS for SME'S: Financial instruments, provisions, revenue recognition, lease accounting

Caryn Maitland

08h00 – 12h00

4

4 June

Tax

Loans and their consequences

Carmen Westermeyer

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

24 June

Law

BBBEE Update

Allison Williams

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

Cape Town

21 May

Governance

Practical aspects of the business judgement rule

Richard Foster

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

11 June

Governance

Practical risk management

Pat Mahony

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

Gaborone

2 July

Governance

Practical risk management

Pat Mahony

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

12 August

Governance

The basics of corporate governance

Tebogo Magang

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

Windhoek

16 July

Governance

Practical risk management

Pat Mahony

08h00 – 10h30

2.5

Integrated Reporting Awards

CSSA textbooks: on sale now

Download the leaflet - PDF

Important dates in 2015

Exams

18 May - 29 May

Results released

3 July

Premier corporate governance conference

27 & 28 October

Integrated Reporting Awards

11 November

This is the first edition of the Chartered Secretaries Southern Africa eZine 2015. Should you have any suggestions or specific information you would like included in future editions, please revert to the membership and marketing department, membership@chartsec.co.za.